Cooperative Publications / Learning Consortium

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Calendar

Mount Shasta: Summer 2019 Learning Exchange
Jun
24
to Jun 28

Mount Shasta: Summer 2019 Learning Exchange

LEARNING EXCHANGES INCLUDE: (1) GUIDED TRAVEL TO IMPORTANT REGIONAL CULTURAL SITES; (2) INTERDISCIPLINARY-CREATIVE WORKSHOPS; (3) MEALTIME CONVERSATIONS; AND (4) AMPLE OPPORTUNITIES TO READ, WRITE AND REFLECT IN STUNNING NATURAL AND CULTURAL GEOGRAPHIES.   

LEARNING EXCHANGES ALSO PROVIDE EACH GROUP AN OPPORTUNITY TO CONDUCT FIELD RESEARCH AND BEGIN PREPARATION FOR A COLLABORATIVE ISSUE OF THE THE FOURTH WORLD JOURNAL, OUR MAGAZINE DEDICATED TO THE CREATIVE ARTS. 

2019 Learning Exchange : Mytheopia and Art Practice

 Mount Shasta  /  June 24th-28th

This Learning Exchange focuses on Mytheopia and Art Practice - two of the Creative Concerns of Fourth World.   The exchange takes place at the feet of Mount Shasta,  a place of stunning beauty as well as setting for a rich variety of mythologies. The indigenous territories of the Wintu, Achumawi, Atsugewi and Modoc all border this cascade mountain strato-volcano and their cultural production is pervasively influenced by Mount Shasta's geophysical and spiritual presence.  The Wintu, for instance, trace their collective genesis to a sacred spring on the mountain and the Klamath believe Chief Skell came to Mount Shasta in order to fight an epic battle. 

Frederick Spencer Oliver's A Dweller on Two Planets, as example of the literary tradition of the area, claims that Lemurians - ancient survivors of a sunken continent - once lived in tunnels beneath the mountain.   Perhaps because of this accumulation of local mytheopia, a variety of New Age groups also seem to thrive in the area.  Potential readings for the Learning Exchange include:  Shadows of Shasta; A Dweller on Two Planets; The Scarlet Letter; Walden Pond and The Island of Dr. Moreau.  The signs and symbols of regional artistic and religious practice will be considered as well as the idea of progress.  A variety or artistic modalities will be explored through creative activities, mealtime discussions, notebook and reading exercises, cooperative seminars and a group "Shasta Vortex" adventure.  The deadline to RSVP for the 2019 Learning Exchange to Mount Shasta is September 10th, 2018.  There will be up to three (3) cost waivers available for Fourth World Members who would like to attend but find the $ 1,950 cost (local travel, accommodations, meals and program fee) prohibitive. 

To RSVP to participate in the 2019 Learning Exchange at Mount Shasta, please send Fourth World a brief autobiography, cover letter and creative response to the following prompt:  "How do we best achieve true progress?  When, if ever, does our pursuit of betterment 'cross-the-line?'" 

If you would like to be considered for one of up to three available cost waivers, please also include a brief rationale with your application.  Send autobiography, cover letter, creative response (and rationale if applying for a cost waiver) to fourthworldcooperative@gmail.com by the deadline

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Creative Contest and Grant Deadline:  September 10, 2018
Sep
10
11:30 PM23:30

Creative Contest and Grant Deadline: September 10, 2018

Fourth World Journal  Issue #2

Cives Sum: I am a citizen 

THE THEME OF THE SECOND ISSUE IS CIVES SUM: I AM A CITIZEN AND DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS  September 10th.

Our Creative Concerns

What are the cultural, artistic and mythic explanations we offer as answers to questions such as What is our purpose?   Where do we come from?  and Where are we going?  Moreover, explorations of memory ask:  How do we learn from the past?   What truths do we know and which ones do we intentionally, or inadvertently, forget?  

The concept of genius loci often gets to the heart of who we are, our place(s).   Related concerns include exile and home, wandering and return, getting lost and being found.  What is familiar and what is terra incognito, why?  Why does 'knowing your place' matter and when and how should we escape one position and find a new location? 

 Some are ruled by ideology or fear while others are governed only by their passions.  We often struggle to belong to or escape from certain groupings.  What are the most beneficial forms of citizenship?  Are there past groupings we should avoid?  How should we best divide people and when should we seek common ground?   Are there alternative forms of creative citizenship as yet unexplored?

Change—we often experience—is inevitable and swift. New movements, forms and aesthetic practices seek to express our transformations. Yet, still we ask: Is there unchanging beauty and truth? What is in motion and what, if anything, is permanent and why?  

Publication, Learning Exchange, Waiver and Creative Honorarium Opportunities

The Fourth World Journal currently solicits any number of forms

1) parables and philippics, personal epistles, essays and testaments; 

2) academic and cultural essays, manifestos, lectures and sermons, political and policy position papers; 

3) short-stories, poems, psalms, lyrics and plays; and

4) scientific-mathematical-religious treatises and digital photographic/cinematic representations. 

 

Both members and non-members are eligible to submit publication proposals for publication.  Submissions must relate to at least one of Fourth World's principle concerns (see above) and, at this time, we seek only previously unpublished creative works that can be digitally reproduced.   

The Fourth World Journal  and Fourth World Cooperative Publications awards up to 40 Creative Honoraria (of $25-$50 each) every year to writers, musicians, photographers, videographers and other artists who express themselves through print and/or through digitally reproducible mediums.  In time for our winter release each year, the publishing house prepares and distributes these chosen works along with various special projects - including creative works of writing, music, photography, drawing, painting and videography. 

The Fourth World Learning Consortium helps offset the costs of participating in an annual Learning Exchange by offering 3-6 Learning Exchange Program Waivers (up to $3,000) for members who find the cost prohibitive.  Each year, the consortium also awards up to 40 Creative Honoraria (of $25-$50 each) to young readers and musicians in our Young Reader and Music Lives! student programs.              

The annual deadline to apply to participate in a Learning Exchange, seek a Learning Exchange Program Waiver, submit a creative work for consideration by Fourth World Cooperative Publications and the Fourth World Journalor apply to participate in our Young Reader or Music Lives! programs or a Birds of a Feather Camp is September 10th

Please send all requests to fourthworldcooperative@gmail.com. 

All petitions for a Learning Exchange Program Waiver and/or a Creative Honorarium require either Fourth World Membership or a minimal ($5) Review Fee. We will confirm member status (or receipt of review fee) and our Review Board  will review proposals for participation in a Learning Exchange as well as applications for Learn Exchange Program Waivers and Creative Honorarium.  Notification of acceptance for participation in a Learning Exchange, an offer of a waiver, honorarium or publication will be communicated via e-mail prior to December 1st. 

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Field Experience: Travertine Hot Springs and Bodie State Park (Ghost Town)
Aug
10
to Aug 12

Field Experience: Travertine Hot Springs and Bodie State Park (Ghost Town)

This is a 2 day field experience to the Travertine Hot Springs near Bridgeport (California) and Bodie State Park (California).  Small travel stipends to offset meals and accommodations are available.  CORE READING:  La casa de los espiritus (The House of the Spirits) by Isabel Allende --provided free to all Field Experience participants before our adventure.

 

 

 

RECOMMENDED ROAD-TRIP READINGS: American Nations: A History of the 11 Rival Regional Cultures of North America by Colin Woodard; It Can't Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis; On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the 20th Century by Timothy Snyder (gifted during the experience to participants) 

 

Reservations for this event are now closed.

 

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Hawaii: Summer 2018 Learning Exchange
Jun
23
to Jun 30

Hawaii: Summer 2018 Learning Exchange

FORUM — From the October 2017 issue

Haleiwa, Hawaii  By Paul Theroux

When people in Hawaii first learned of North Korea’s latest threat — that it might soon launch a preemptive strike that could obliterate our lovely islands with a nuclear bomb as powerful as those that wiped out Hiroshima and Nagasaki — it was news for a few days. Older people mumbled about Pearl Harbor. Then we islanders went back to the issues that really concern us: the terrible traffic, the chronic homeless problem, the unfunded Honolulu Rail Transit project, the cost of gas, and the surf report — not necessarily in that order. “How often do you go to the States?” tourists sometimes ask, to the great annoyance of people here, which though very distant from the mainland is no stranger to the mainland’s woes.

The ominous news continued to come, though. Because North Korea is a habitual blunderer, the missile might veer off course and miss the islands. If it did we would still be subjected to a catastrophic electromagnetic pulse, which would short-circuit our communications systems, satellites, microwaves, TV sets, and everything else that runs on electricity. This actually happened before, on July 9, 1962, when a 1.4 megaton American bomb was detonated over Johnston Atoll and Hawaii’s electricity fizzled out for a day or so. But even the possibility of that cauchemardesque event did not get much attention.

North Korea is roughly 4,700 miles from Hawaii. (Funnily enough, Washington, D.C., is about the same distance.) But the homeless problem is much closer, mainly on Oahu, where I live — forty encampments on iconic Diamond Head alone, tents and sidewalk shacks lining Nimitz Highway, visible to tourists coming from the airport. A large proportion of the residents are local. “We are not homeless, we are houseless,” one ragged man explained to me. Some are originally from the mainland, but many are Micronesians driven from the radioactive islands and toxic atolls we blighted with bomb tests in the Forties and Fifties, living like refugees in the parks and under the bridges.

And then there’s the Honolulu rail project, which broke ground in 2011. Parts of it exist as the palpable fragment of a good idea, but it will soon run out of money. The state legislature cannot come up with the billions needed to finish it. So there it remains, stark and incomplete, a ghostly, disconnected viaduct suspended over the traffic jams and bungaloid neighborhoods. (Speaking of those bungalows, Hawaii has the highest housing prices of any state in the nation.)

Oahu is the most urbanized of the seven inhabited islands, and the most populous: Of the roughly 1.5 million people in the state, almost 1 million live here. The other islands are distinct, each with its own peculiar conceits and anxieties. Maui is touristy; Kauai a model of civic planning and resistance to developers; Lanai a pineapple plantation transformed into a resort destination, almost owned entirely by the multibillionaire Larry Ellison. Molokai is largely ranchland; the Big Island is roomy and diverse, and, with active volcanoes still spewing lava, it is getting bigger; tiny Niihau is privately owned by the Robinson family and culturally native Hawaiian. All these islands have different priorities, but they are united in their love of hula and high school sports, and their ardent provincialism.

It’s odd that Hawaii is provincial, because it is dense with military bases and home to nearly 50,000 military personnel. You’d think such warriors would be our link with international conflict, with Asia, with Afghanistan, Iraq, and other places, because soldiers have tales to tell. But they keep their heads down. Their spouses are visible at the beach with their small children, parents sitting out the latest tour, praying for it to end.

During last year’s presidential election, some Trump signs appeared, yet Hillary took Hawaii. But so what? We are at such a remove that the presidential election is already decided by the time our votes are counted. The mainland is distant and we are for the most part overlooked, isolated in the precise meaning of the word: islanders. We take the traditional Chinese view, “The sky is high and the emperor is far away.” In spite of the high cost of living, smugness and a sunny disposition predominate, and until we are woken by a North Korean missile strike, most people will go on repeating the local mantra, “Lucky we live Hawaii.”

 

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Four Seasons and Fourth World
May
10
6:45 PM18:45

Four Seasons and Fourth World

"Four Seasons"

A series of short plays and a post-production mealtime discussion with the director, actors and crew.

Please join us for the opening night of an exciting series of short plays written and directed by Professor Michael Lynch.  After the production, join the director and actors for a free gourmet meal to talk about the short plays as well as the professions of acting, writing, directing and artistic production.

Four Seasons: Louise and Rachel and other original short plays
Written & Directed by Michael Lynch
Opening Night Performance May 10th
MJC, Cabaret West Theatre

A Production of the Modesto Junior College/ Arts, Humanities and Communications Division

Free Mealtime Discussion sponsored by Fourth World.  PLEAE RSVP HERE if you are a member of Fourth World attending the post-production dinner here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/four-seasons-and-post-production-mealtime-discussion-tickets-44694208581?aff=es2 

Tickets to the play are $11 but Fourth World members who email fourthworldcooperative@gmail.com prior to April 15th and solicit admission will be given a free ticket to the performance as well.

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Music Lives! Performance and Mealtime Conversation
Mar
30
7:30 PM19:30

Music Lives! Performance and Mealtime Conversation

With a sold-out performance by the L.A. Guitar QuartetMusic Lives! began in 2012 as a music series designed to preserve and promote the performance of traditional western art music.  For five years now, Music Lives! aspires to serve music students and enthusiasts by exposing them to established performers from around the world, and at affordable prices. Students, moreover, are able to interact with visiting artists one-on-one through lectures workshops, master classes, and live rehearsals.

 

The series has presented a variety of artists that include two-time Latin Grammy-winning Cuarteto Latinoamericano, pianists Jorge Federico OsorioMauricio Nader and Baroque music ensemble Richard Savino & El Mundo as well as internationally renowned baritone Vladimir Chernov. Upcoming artists include Grammy winning latin jazz trombonist Jamie Dubberly and pianist Natsuki Fukasawa.  Music Lives! is committed to cultivating music literacy and love for the musical arts.

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Tuscan Culinary Encounter:  Yankee Hill Culinary School
Mar
26
10:30 AM10:30

Tuscan Culinary Encounter: Yankee Hill Culinary School

We will be visiting Yankee Hill Culinary School for an experience learning how to make (and eat!) Tuscan food.   For more about the venue see: http://yankeehillwinery.com


You will need to arrive at 10:30am on 3/26.  We will learn how to cook a gourmet meal and then will enjoy the vineyard grounds as we eat and talk about the Humanities and its value in our lives.

Yankee Hill Winery and Cooking School is located in the Sierra Foothills in the historic gold rush town of Columbia, California   The winery is the oldest winery in the Sierra Foothills.  It is a small winery and a cooking school with Ron Erickson as the wine maker, cooking instructor and chef extraordinaire.  Our winery was started in 1970 and the cooking school was started in 1995.  The cooking school runs year round with scheduled classes almost every Saturday morning and group classes can be scheduled any day of the week.


The school offers a variety of cuisines.  The kitchen is well equipped and has large ovens for baking breads, pizzas and other wonderful savory and sweet items.  Each item selected to prepare normally contains no more than seven ingredients.  Natural ingredients are used and if you can’t purchase the ingredients at your local super market they will not part of the ingredients used.  The food is delicious and fun to cook.  

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Travel GRANT deadline for Learning Exchange to the Hawaiian Islands
Mar
10
11:45 PM23:45

Travel GRANT deadline for Learning Exchange to the Hawaiian Islands

KAUAI, Hawaii    

   Mark Twain sent word of first impressions from the islands: “I think it was a fortunate accident that led me to stumble into this enchanted ground.”

All members are welcome to the 2018 Learning Exchange-- a gathering of writers, photographers, artists, teachers, translators and editors of various ages and nationalities seeking time to consider the second issue of our collaborative, international journal.

__________________________________

For additional details concerning the 2018 Kauai Learning Exchange, please contact F0U®TH WO®LD.  Members who would like to be considered for a grant to help cover travel costs, please e-mail us (prior to the deadline) a cover letter and a two-page response to this question:  “What is Citizenship?”

PLEASE RSVP prior to March 10th HERE

Grant Deadline is March 10, 2018         

FoU®TH   WO®LD, a non-profit which coordinates Learning Exchanges in awe-inspiring settings for creative purposes, invites its membership to work collaboratively on an issue of our cooperative journal.  We especially encourage all those who love reading, writing and mealtime conversations to join, as well as all writers, artists, teachers, grandparents and students.  The 2018 Learning Exchange is to Kauai, Hawaii (June 25-29) and participants will conduct creative field research and have time together to plan for a collective issue of the JOU®NAL. Readings to be explored include Mark Twain’s The Diary of Adam and Eve; Aldous Huxley’s Island; Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles, and Mary Oliver’s poetry collection, “American Primitive.”

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Young Readers Program Grant Recipient Recognition Brunch
Feb
4
11:00 AM11:00

Young Readers Program Grant Recipient Recognition Brunch

https://www.fourthworldcooperative.org/goods/internship-or-reading-program-participation-fee

This event celebrates those chosen in our latest round of youth sponsorship. Fourth World will recognize the elementary, middle, high school and college students of our membership who have been selected to receive up to a $300 grant to read and talk with others about books.

For those students who wish to participate in the program but are unable to afford Fourth World Membership, you may also pay a Review Fee of $5 to submit a grant proposal for our Young Readers Program in which FOURTH WORLD will pay you $2/hour to read for 1-3 months!

 

 

 

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Young Readers Program Monthly Discussion
Jan
6
10:00 AM10:00

Young Readers Program Monthly Discussion

FOURTH WORLD LEARNING CONSORTIUM ONGOING READING GRANTS

To apply for the Young Readers Program either become a Fourth Fourth World Member or pay the $5 Review FEE.  Then send a short email to fourthworldcooperative@gmail.com explaining why you would like to be considered to receive up to $100 a month for 1-3 months by simply reading! Applications accepted all year long.

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Rapa Nui: Summer 2019 Learning Exchange (Far Off and Underground Places)
Jan
1
to Jan 5

Rapa Nui: Summer 2019 Learning Exchange (Far Off and Underground Places)

Cultural Heritage, Indigenous and Sacred Sites in California and Oceania is a project involving a combination of independent study and travel within California and Oceania culminating in creative fiction and photographic works, a curricular development project, faculty-student publications and the fomentation of cross-institutional collaborations and grant applications with other institutions such as the University of California system, California Humanities and the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas, California. 

This proposal aims to link common problems in the field of Humanities shared by both California and Oceania.  Although seemingly “worlds apart,” both of these geographies are currently struggling to find ways to raise awareness of the value and fragility of cultural heritage, indigenous and sacred sites in order to develop sustainable solutions which protect these sites from the effects of extreme drought, flooding and other severe weather events. In the summer of 2019 Fourth World will travel to the heart of Oceania (Rapa Nui in particular, known to non-indigenous geopolitical organizations as Easter Island, the most remote place on planet earth) to write creative fiction, publish photography and create, evaluate and publish curricular units as well as plan for future grant applications with other regional higher-education institutions, non-profits and museums.  At heart, all of these efforts aim to study and publish creative and curricular materials which promote the appreciation and protection of cultural heritage, indigenous and sacred sites in both California and Oceania.

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Field Experience--Ukiah: From 10,000 Buddhas, Skunk Train, Horses and Buffalo To Local Hot Springs
Dec
28
to Dec 29

Field Experience--Ukiah: From 10,000 Buddhas, Skunk Train, Horses and Buffalo To Local Hot Springs

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The south end of Ukiah is home to the City of 10,000 Buddhas. Welcoming all visitors, this Buddhist monastery, training facility, university, and prayer and meditation center occupies the site of a former state hospital built in the 1930s. The highlight for visitors is the Hall of 10,000 Buddhas, which lives up to that name thanks to the thousands of Buddhas lining its walls. You can also enjoy delicious vegetarian cuisine at the Jyun Kang Restaurant.

Specializing in education and inspiration, the 12-acre Real Goods Solar Living Center offers the best place on Hwy. 101 to break up your road trip. The Center features a free picnic area, three different ponds, a children’s play area that’s fun and educational, tours, and shopping. For those who have a serious interest, take the 45-minute tour and learn how wind and the sun can be converted to clean renewable energy. Check out the organic garden, permaculture landscape and many types of eco-friendly building materials including passive and active solar design in the architecture.

The Skunk Train will take you back in time as you are whisked away on a fantastic journey. This is a historically accurate train line running from Willits, just north of Ukiah, to Fort Bragg that showcases the phenomenal beauty of the area. Everyone will enjoy winding through the countryside over bridges and trestles and through tunnels. Breathtaking views of 1,000-year-old redwoods and crisp clean mountain air are just a few of the wonderful reasons to take a ride on the Skunk Train.

Taking its name from a legendary Himalayan kingdom in Tibet where there was a harmonious society, Shambhala Ranch is one of Mendocino county’s most famous spas. It has its own solar electric system that keeps it completely independent of the grid, and helps maintain the natural atmosphere. Pamper yourself with a relaxing stone massage, raindrop massage, reiki or chakra balancing.

Named after the world famous springs first discovered by Julius Caesar in France, the virtually identical waters of Ukiah’s Vichy Springs surge forth from six miles deep within the earth. Featuring the only warm and naturally carbonated “Vichy” mineral baths in North America, the water is naturally warm and effervescent, filled with minerals and energy, and is renowned for its healing and restorative qualities.

Opened in 1854, California Historical Landmark #980, Vichy Springs was a favorite retreat of writers Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson and Jack London, and Presidents Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Harrison and Teddy Roosevelt. Vichy Springs Resort is the oldest continuously operated spa in California.

Orr Hot Springs is a small, tranquil resort settled deep in the rolling hills of the Mendocino Coastal Range. Situated on a beautiful country road between Ukiah and Mendocino, the Springs flourish on 27 acres at the headwaters of the Big River. In the late 1800’s, “Orr’s Hot Sulphur Springs” became a resting spot on the Ukiah-Mendocino stagecoach line, and was a popular resort for city-dwellers who came seeking health and relaxation.

The mineral waters come to the tubs hot from the earth at approximately 106 degrees F. Sulphur, calcium, potassium, boron, and many other naturally occurring minerals are in abundance, making for a truly healthful and rejuvenating bath.

Seabiscuit, the legendary racehorse and subject of a major motion picture, lived and is buried at Ridgewood Ranch in Willits along Highway 101 just north of Ukiah. San Francisco auto salesman, Charles Howard, paid $7,500 for Seabiscuit and hired trainer Tom Smith and jockey Red Pollard to race him. Together they turned a 3-year-old, seemingly broken-down, rebellious horse into a champion and one of the greatest racehorses in history.

Together, they embodied the American spirit and gave hope to millions of Americans during the darkest economic era our nation has ever faced. With one victory after another, Seabiscuit lifted the citizens of our country out of the despair of the Great Depression and became the greatest icon of his time.

Now this is where the Buffalo Roam. Take a tour of this fantastic 1,000-acre working bison ranch on a revamped military truck through rain-forest like terrain

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Learning Exchange:  "Mohave Desert: Crossing the Line"
Nov
18
to Nov 25

Learning Exchange: "Mohave Desert: Crossing the Line"

  • Learning Exchanges include: (1) guided travel to important regional cultural sites; (2) interdisciplinary-creative workshops; (3) mealtime conversations; and (4) ample opportunities to read, write and reflect on art practice in stunning natural geographies. 

This is a 7 day Learning Exchange through California's Central Valley, Death Valley National Park (California), the Mohave Desert and Las Vegas (Nevada).  Stargazing included. 

A SPECIAL GRANT  has been set up to help cover the meal, accommodation and travel costs for several members wishing to join the NEXT LEARNING EXCHANGE (NOV. 18-25th) in the MOHAVE DESERT.  Travel GRANTS ($250-$895) are available.  Simply send an email to fourthworldcooperative.org and share with us your "best idea to change the world." Deadline for travel grant application to the Mohave Desert Learning Exchange is October 1, 2017 (midnight Pacific time).  Because of the nature of setting for this exchange (including casinos), all participants must be 21 years old or accompanied by a legal guardian/parent at all times during this Thanksgiving Week Exchange.

CORE READINGS:

Society of Spectacle by Guy Debord

The Book of Psalms trans. by Robert Alter

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil De Grasse Tyson

The Book of Joan by Lidia Yuknavitch

These books are gifted to all participants for reading during the week and after.  Grants to offset meal, accommodation and/or travel available through the learning consortium.

 

Reservations for this event are now closed.

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Repast Project:  Modesto Junior College Family Mealtime Conversation (Religious Freedom)
Oct
4
6:00 PM18:00

Repast Project: Modesto Junior College Family Mealtime Conversation (Religious Freedom)

The Repast Project is our effort to confront declines in civility and reading habits by hosting mealtime conversations with members and others.  The end is always a dinner table (without electronic devices) where we talk about books and ideas in"unconventional" learning spaces: local restaurants, teacher's homes, farms and even prisons.  Currently, we are partnering with Modesto Junior College’s Student Success and Equity Project to provide over a hundred students, professors and community leaders with: (1) a free gourmet meal ; (2) opportunities for meaningful cross-cultural conversation about multi-dimensional issues; and (3) a free book to continue reading and talking about things that matter in their own jobs and homes and with family and friends.  But why?  To begin with, in our age of connectivity  we have little time for face-to-face conversations and deep reading.  Globally we have seen--in just one generation--a drastic decrease in all-important dinnertime conversations and a frightening rise in source illiteracy.  In fact, the next generation is part of an America that seems to have no time anymore for thoughtful conversation or complex reading.  The results are dire: non-readers have nearly tripled since 1978.  The loss of social time and eye-to-eye group conversation conspires against today’s cyber-youth, as often they suffer from growing isolation and, perhaps, are on the edge of a millennial mental health crisis.  This disengagement and dearth of "Basic Skills" does not go by unnoticed by irked businesses who complain of employees that “…do not know how to effectively carry on a conversation and are unable to do things like ask questions, listen actively and maintain eye contact.”  Thus, the Repast Project worries that we--as a species--have lost (in a single generation) the skills of civil, face-to-face conversation about complicated issues and are witnessing the slow death of literary reading practices.  Contact:  fourthworldcooperative@gmail.com for more information.

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Birds of Feather Day Camp
Oct
2
to Oct 7

Birds of Feather Day Camp

Birds of a Feather Day Camps

The Next Birds of a Feather Day Camp is scheduled for October 2nd-7th, 2017. 

This day camp also allow time for kids to put down their electronic devices, play in the fields with the goats, dogs, rabbits and feed the chickens, ducks and turkey, dogs. When not reading in a hammock under the oaks, gardening or having a snack-time conversation, kids are making observations, taking pictures and preparing their first public art exhibition!

 

RSVP for the FORMAL AFTER_SCHOOL events from 3-5pm on Monday, Oct. 2nd and the public art exhibition and gathering from 5-8pm on Saturday Oct. 7th

https://fourthworld.typeform.com/to/HJbeuH

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Special Travel Grant Application Deadline
Oct
1
11:58 PM23:58

Special Travel Grant Application Deadline

A SPECIAL GRANT  

has been set up to help cover the meal, accommodation and travel costs for several members wishing to join the NEXT LEARNING EXCHANGE (NOV. 18-25th) in the MOHAVE DESERT.  Travel GRANTS ($250-$895) are available.  Simply send an email to fourthworldcooperative.org and share with us your "best idea to change the world." Deadline for travel grant application to the Mohave Desert Learning Exchange is October 1, 2017 (midnight Pacific time).  

BECAUSE OF THE NATURE OF SETTING FOR THIS EXCHANGE (INCLUDING CASINOS), ALL PARTICIPANTS MUST BE 21 YEARS OLD OR ACCOMPANIED BY A LEGAL GUARDIAN/PARENT AT ALL TIMES DURING THIS THANKSGIVING WEEK EXCHANGE.

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